Hong Kong artist "King of Kowloon" Tsang Tsou-Choi started drawing street walls with Chinese calligraphy (or Shūfǎ 書法) in 1956 while his work was one of the first graffiti expressions in Hong Kong. Tsang completed more than 55,000 works until his death in 2007.

Most of his street artwork has been replaced or erased by Hong Kong's construction development or renovation, so a project was created by Google's online cultural platform in order to preserve Tsang Tsou-Choi's artwork. Actually, Tsang was the first artist to be featured in Google's cultural platform where more than 170 of his street artwork was saved and presented online. Chang's work was considered by iconic Chinese museums and government as "too controversial" to care for so the only place people can find and enjoy his calligraphy street art is through Google's Arts & Culture online platform. Tsang (aka King of Kowloon) claimed that Kowloon belonged to his ancestor's clan so he wandered around Hong Kong's Kowloon district claiming his land and naming his family members

names through his graffiti and calligraphy artwork. One of Tsang Tsou-Choi's last calligraphy works was in Hong Kong's electricity box and was destroyed about a year ago by a government contractor. Kowloon was famous for its walled city which was torn down 25 years ago (March of 1994). It was called The Wall City because it was built as a high-rise squatter camp covering an enormous complex of 300 interconnected buildings. This used to be one of the most crowded places on earth, 119 times as dense a New York City. From the 1950's, which was the year the complex started building up until its demolition year in 1994, more than 33,000 lived and worked inside the 6.4-acre city. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fd56CGnVRU Tsang Tsou Choi 曾灶財 King of…

This an experiment by Canon's The Lab called as Decoy, about a man who was photographed by six different photographers.

In each of the shoots, he wears the same outfit but he told a different story about his personal background to each of the photographers. One of the photographers was told that he is an ex-convict while another was told that he was a self-made millionaire. The result is unique; photographers shaped the way that man looked like revealing the power that is hidden behind the lens.

Rodrigo Dada is a Costa Rican photographer born on 1987, currently working in El Salvador as a freelancer.

His Voragine(Vortex in english) artwork is about "about personal crisis and the human ability to regenerate, to rise from our ashes", it features people struggling to balance themselves with their objects and possibly find their real meaning.

Native American Artist Bunky Echo-Hawk, a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, is a multidisciplinary artist and poet known best for his acrylic paintings.

Through his art, Echo-Hawk is able to merge his traditional values with his lifestyle, producing works that cover Native American topics and hip-hop culture. Echo-Hawk teaches both art and writing, conducts workshops, and speaks at conferences across the country. His work has been exhibited across the US and internationally and he was chosen as the 2012 Eiteljorg Museum

Artist in Residence. He started using gas masks in his artworks originally to raise awareness for toxic and radioactive waste sites that were popping up in Indian Country, "I wanted people to think about it, to ask questions. So, I used the image, and idea, of the gas mask" from Bunky Exho-Hawk blog. Bunky Echo-Hawk Prints Bunky Echo-Hawk Portraits

What happens when two guys / CorridorDigital, a GoPro Hero+ Black and a DJI Phantom II quadcopter come together?

This is a POV video showing Superman’s eyes view as he flies around Los Angeles doing his everyday job, rescuing a girl from a flaming building, stopping some bad guys from running away from

the cops etc. Video has been created using a Go Pro Hero3+ Black pov camera and with the help of a DJI Phantom II quadcopter it flew over LA giving us another perspective of the city.